Materials Performance

NOV 2018

Materials Performance is the world's most widely circulated magazine dedicated to corrosion prevention and control. MP provides information about the latest corrosion control technologies and practical applications for every industry and environment.

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31 MATERIALS PERFORMANCE: VOL. 57, NO. 11 NOVEMBER 2018 COATINGS & LININGS ESSENTIALS Continued f rom page 29 NACE NEW ORLEANS SECTION 20TH ANNUAL EDUCATION WEEK DECEMBER 3-8, 2018 • NEW ORLEANS AIRPORT HILTON Register for NACE Section Local Courses at nace.org/nolaedu NACE NEW ORLEANS SECTION COURSES DATES PRICE INSTRUCTOR Corrosion in Oil and Gas Production (COG) December 3-5 $400 Charlie Speed, Consultant Corrosion Under Insulation (CUI) December 3-5 $500 Peter Bock, CUI Consultant Rectifier School (RECT) December 3-4 $250 Trey Johnston, Corrpro Oilfield Operator Chemical School (OOCS) December 6-7 $300 Charlie Speed & 15 Other Experts (www.nace.org/nolaOOCS) GENERAL NACE EDUCATION COURSES DATES PRICE NACE CERTIFIED INSTRUCTORS Basic Corrosion (BC) December 3-7 For pricing and to register for these NACE General Education courses, go to nace.org/ nolacourses Bop Phull Designing For Corrosion Control (DCC) December 3-7 Jerry Byrd Corrosion in Refining Industry (CCRI) December 3-7 Ray Quinter Protective Coatings Specialist (PCS-1 BASIC) December 3-5 Kat Coronado Protective Coatings Specialist (PCS-2 ADVANCED) December 6-8 Kat Coronado Students are responsible for hotel reservations. Contact the New Orleans Airport Hilton at +1 504-469-5000 or 1 800-445-8667 and ask for the NACE Event Rate Code: NAC. Room rate is $139/night. For pricing and to register for NACE General Education courses, go to nace.org/nolacourses For information about New Orleans Section Events, go to nace.org/nola For questions, call Charlie Speed at +1 504-400-7878 I N T E R N A T I O N A L to extend the drying time of each coating layer." A "wet edge" refers to the process of avoiding obvious join lines between sec- tions of coating. ey also applied a "stripe coat" over welds and other joints. Berry adds that the massive girders—the heaviest weighed 86 tons—were the largest compo- nents that his company has been involved with. Scissor-lift platforms were required to allow the applicators to safely reach the highest areas on the outside and scaffolding for those on the inside. "ese girder sections were huge and comprised 20 individual sections each," says Hawkes. "e Ayliffes Road bridge will be a total length of 390-m long, which is a pretty decent bridge in anyone's terms—especially when you have to move it." e three steel box girder structures for the project were constructed using an inno- vative method whereby the structures were built off-site, transported, and precisely maneuvered into place using self-propelled modular transports (SPMTs). is method of bridge construction is commonplace throughout Europe and the Americas. How- ever, this was the first time SPMTs have been used in Australia by the infrastructure sector to install a fully completed structure. When a coating is properly applied, inspected, and qualified, it should easily provide 25 years or more of protection, although many projects today are even specifying 50 and 100-year life expectancy. New capital investment in some areas may be slowing down, but governments around the country have recently announced plans for large-scale road and rail projects that will provide many opportunities for corro- sion control and prevention companies. References 1 NACE No. 2/SSPC-SP 10/Sa 2 1/2, "Near- White Metal" (Houston, TX: NACE Interna- tional). 2 AS/NZS 2321.1, "Guide to the protection of structural steel against atmospheric corro- sion by the use of protective coatings—Paint c oatings" (Sydn ey, Australi a : Stand ard s Australia). Source: e Australasian Corrosion Associa- tion, www.corrosion.com.au. Contact Christine Filippis, Teraze Communications Pty Ltd.—tel: +61 3 8391 0701, email: info@ teraze.com.au.

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