Materials Performance

DEC 2014

Materials Performance is the world's most widely circulated magazine dedicated to corrosion prevention and control. MP provides information about the latest corrosion control technologies and practical applications for every industry and environment.

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47 NACE INTERNATIONAL: VOL. 53, NO. 12 MATERIALS PERFORMANCE DECEMBER 2014 Continued on page 48 A: I was once asked to examine a turbine in a turbine hall of a coal- fred power station in a large factory complex. Te turbine was set on a steel plate and the latter was surrounded by ceramic tiles on the foor. Te hall was in immaculate condition. However, the turbine had run out of alignment. Te janitor in the hall was enthusiastic in his attempts to remove all traces of coal dust and habitually washed the ceramic tiles twice daily to keep them spark ling. The cleaning water had seeped beneath the steel bedplate and the painted concrete foundation. As a result, corrosion of the underside of the bedplate had occurred and the wedging action of the corrosion product had caused the misalignment. The corrosion problem was easily overcome, but the cost of reset- ting the turbine was mighty expensive. Dry ice blasting Q: I would appreciate your experi- ence with dry ice blasters vs. the traditional blast-cleaning methods. A: I can tell you from witnessing demonstrations that it is a very slow process compared to dry or wet blast. A lso, dry ice blasting will not create an anchor profle. I'm sure it's advanta- geous in some situations. Tere will be no profle from the dry ice blasting, but you will get a very clean surface. Environmentally preferable bridge paint Q: Does anyone have experience with environmentally preferable bridge paint? This might mean ultra-low volatile organic compounds (VOCs), or a system consisting of less than base, middle, and topcoats. We would be especially interested in hearing about success stories for municipalities or county governments that are "pushing the envelope" on environmental criteria for bridge paint. A: I suppose the Texas Department of Transportation's System II and System IV could qualif y. Both are two-coat systems. System II is our standard feld-applied system: epoxy zinc primer and either a solvent-based or acrylic latex appearance coat (acrylic We would be especially interested in hearing about success stories for municipalities or county governments that are "pushing the envelope" on environmental criteria for bridge paint.

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